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Publications > Articles > 2009 > 2009:019 Institutional Variation and Political Support: An Analysis of CSES Data from 29 Countries  

Institutional Variation and Political Support: An Analysis of CSES Data from 29 Countries

Ola Listhaug, Bernt Aardal, Ingunn Opheim Ellis

I: Hans-Dieter Klingemann (red.),
The Comparative Study of Electoral Systems Oxford: Oxford University Press (2009)

Recent scholarship in political science has attempted to demonstrate how political institutions influence citizens’ belief in government. A review of previous studies shows that there is considerable ambiguity in the hypotheses used to guide empirical research. Much of the problem is created by the fact that accountability and representation are properties that should be maximized simultaneously if systems want to have high political support. Thus, we hypothesize that efficacy, which denotes voters’ evaluations of the system’s ability to respond to policy concerns, would be more positive in systems that maximize representation, while agreement with a statement which says that it matters who is in power, would be higher i systems that maximize accountability. The tests of these expectations produce meager empirical results. We are not able to demonstrate clear effects of institutional choices on political support.


English Keywords

Political support